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Welcome to the Bridge Club

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Sometimes less is more – This is a phrase that gets thrown around a lot, maybe too much. It can definitely ring true when it comes to backpacking and other outdoor pursuits though. When gear is selected for any outing, it’s important to consider which pieces are necessary to carry along, or maybe there is something else that can serve more than one purpose. I suppose a better word might be streamlined.

Welcome the newest member of our touring family, the Bridge Club. The name of the game with the Bridge Club is streamlined simplicity, designed for those tours that traverse both on-road or off-road surfaces.

When it comes to our touring line, the Pugsley is the ride you need when float and traction are critical. The Troll and Ogre are great for off-road touring and carrying BIG loads, but your route may be more pavement heavy or you may never want to run rim brakes. The ECR is the ultimate off-road touring rig, but not everyone is looking to tour across Mongolia. Our trucker line is the go-to for long distance road touring. But what if you want to throw caution to the wind and let your route, plans and terrain be chosen on a whim? On-road? Off-road? Who gives a shit. The Bridge Club will help you bridge the gap…See what I did there?

Bridge Club Geometry

We’ve been making off-road touring bikes for a while now, and over the years we have arrived at a pretty good geometry recipe when it comes to touring on dirt. The Bridge Club uses all of this experience and doesn’t stray far from the Troll/Ogre in ride geometry or fit geometry.


The first big difference is that the Bridge Club is designed around 27.5 x 2.4” (584 BSD) wheels/tires. We designed the Bridge Club to be a good off-road touring rig but kept in mind that someone may want to throw 700c wheels/tires and panniers on and knock out a classic road tour, this is totally possible with the Bridge Club.

The bottom bracket height reflects this at around 295mm/11.6” with the stock tire. This is about 13mm lower than the Ogre and 10mm lower than the Troll. This BB height will be adequate for most off-road situations you find yourself in but won’t be too high if you decide to do some on-road touring. The headtube angles, seat tube angles and ETT closely resemble that of the Troll with a few exceptions. The XS Bridge Club has a 1 degree slacker headtube angle than the Troll to account for toe clearance with a larger OD tire and ETT dimensions vary slightly across sizes.

Rear Spacing

I know what’s coming – “Fuck the bike industry and all of its ever-evolving standards, blah blah blah.” I hear your pain, I really do. The Bridge Club isn’t using a new standard but it is a little more obscure. The bike is designed around 141mm Boost QR hubs to allow for chain clearance and larger volume rubber. The rear spacing is Gnot Boost QR, in that the frame is designed at 138mm. This allows the use of 141mm Boost QR hubs or standard 135mm QR hubs. The frame will flex in or out 1.5mm per side to accommodate either hub width. It’s the same Gnot Boost idea but based around QR axles rather than thru axles.

Bridge Club Features

Many years of designing and testing touring bikes have led us to include feature sets that account for just about anything you may want to attach to your bike. For an ultimate off-road touring rig, like our ECR, numerous three pack mounts, dedicated Rohloff slots, horizontal dropouts, trailer mounts and cast yokes allow for nearly infinite options when it comes to customization. For someone who is just getting into touring or bikepacking that can be a lot to wrap your head around. Or maybe you have been bikepacking and touring for years and you know exactly what you want in a bike. After all, the Swiss Army Knife approach to features may be more than you want. The Bridge Club simplifies those features to the necessities that will get your there and back.

We designed a simpler plate style dropout that still has the Surly aesthetic, but without all of the complexity of our Troll dropout. The dropout features a vertical slot for QR wheels, standard IS brake adapter capability, and mounts for racks and fenders. The ability to run a Rohloff Speedhub wasn’t forgotten, but isn’t as prominent in the Bridge Club as it is in the Troll dropout. The upper rack/fender boss can be used with an OEM2 axle plate and the Rohloff M5 adapter. A chain tensioner is also necessary for this application. The frame will need to be compressed 1.5mm per side to run a 135mm Rohloff hub (similar to our Gnot Boost frames) and is not compatible with the Rohloff A12 hubs.

The frame has triple bottle mounts on the top and bottom of the downtube, and a seat tube water bottle mount on the SM-XL frames. Triple guides on the top tube and single guides elsewhere take care of your cable wrangling needs. There are seatstay mounted barrel bosses for your rack mounting needs and a fender mount on the seatstay bridge.

The fork features upper and lower barrel bosses, one three pack mount on each leg, midblade eyelets, and rack mounts on the fork ends.

Tire Clearance

The Bridge Club was designed around a 27.5 x 2.4” tire, but in the spirit of Fatties Fit Fine we didn’t stop there. The frame and fork have clearance for up to 27.5 x 2.8” and 700 x 47c tires.

Individual tire and rim combos may affect tire clearance and will change bottom bracket height.

Check out the Bridge Club bike page for full spec details, however, highlights include:

SRAM X5 front derailleur, GX 10 speed rear derailleur, Tubeless ready WTB i29 rims and 2.4” Riddler tires, 30.0 mm Surly stainless seat collar, and a comfortable 17 degree swept back bar.

Choices are a wonderful burden sometimes, just ask me where we should go for brunch. I know a million places but I’ll waffle for hours trying to figure out the perfect spot. See what I did there again? Dad jokes aside, sometimes simplicity is just what a person needs. The Bridge Club does just that. Where other models in our line provide that wonderful burden, the Bridge Club provides enough options to outfit your bike for that next on-road or off-road tour without the extra decisions or stress. When it’s all said and done you may even have a little extra cash to grab that frame bag, rack or seat bag and start the long ride to touring glory.

If you’re pumped up by the ramble you just read and want to check out a Bridge Club in person, the following shops have pre-ordered bikes, which are in stores now, or arriving in the coming weeks. As always, international and intergalactic availability and pricing will vary depending on your current whereabouts.

Bicycle Habitat, New York, NY
The Hub Bicycle Co-op, Minneapolis MN
Bike Touring News, Boise ID
The Bike Rack, Washington DC
Thick Bikes, Pittsburgh PA
Halcyon Bike Shop, Nashville TN
Metropolis Cycle Repair, Portland OR
Angry Catfish Bicycle Shop, Minneapolis MN
Michael’s Cycles, Prior Lake, MN
Loose Nuts Cycles, Atlanta GA
Pedal LLC, Littleton CO
City Bike Tampa, Tampa FL
Gladys Bikes, Portland OR
Lee’s Cyclery & Fitness, Fort Collins CO
Bicycle Business, Sacramento CA
YAWP! Cyclery, Edgewater CO
Ponderosa Cyclery, Omaha NE
Blue Dog Bicycles, Tucson AZ

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sulrich
16 days ago
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that sucking sound you hear is coming from my wallet.
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The RSS Revival

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The platformization of the web has claimed many victims, RSS readers included. Google Reader's 2013 demise was a major blow; the company offed it in favor of "products to address each user's interest with the right information at the right time via the most appropriate means," as it Google executive Richard Gingras put it at the time. In other words, letting Google Now decide what you want. And the popular Digg Reader, which was born in response to that shuttering, closed its doors this week after a nearly four-year run.

Despite those setbacks, though, RSS has persisted. "I can't really explain it, I would have thought given all the abuse it's taken over the years that it would be stumbling a lot worse," says programmer Dave Winer, who helped create RSS.

I enjoyed this story on the state of RSS by Wired's Brian Barrett because it resonates with a trend I've also noticed in the past couple of years. Many of us have often praised social networks as "winners" in the battle against pure old RSS feeds, but the reality is that RSS is here to say. Perhaps, like rock and roll, RSS can never truly die.

What's even more interesting is that, beyond RSS as a protocol, RSS services and clients (web backends and apps) are improving and growing more powerful on a weekly basis now. Barrett mentioned Feedly, The Old Reader, and Inoreader (which I've been using since 2016 and offers terrific power user features); I would also add NewsBlur and Feedbin – two services that have relentlessly iterated on the RSS experience since Google Reader's demise. Just in the past few months, for instance, NewsBlur launched infrequent site stories to fix the very problem of subscribing to too many feeds, and Feedbin rolled out support for Twitter subscriptions. Both are genuine innovations that help people who want to get their news directly from the sources they choose. And if we look at the iOS side of this, apps like Fiery Feeds and lire are rethinking what advanced RSS readers for iPhone and iPad should be capable of. We wanted to do an RSS-focused episode of AppStories, and we ended up producing two of them (you can listen here and here) because there was just so much to talk about.

While millions of people may be happy getting their news from Facebook or an aggregator like Apple News (which I also use, occasionally, for more mainstream headlines), the resiliency of RSS makes me happy. There was a time when I thought all my news could come from social feeds and timelines; today, I'm more comfortable knowing that I – not a questionable and morally corrupt algorithm – fully control hundreds of sources I read each day.

→ Source: wired.com

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sulrich
16 days ago
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i'll never forgive google for killing reader. newsblur does a great job though.
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1 public comment
Spuzzy
17 days ago
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Have to leave a plug for Newsblur. Easily the best subscription service I have other than the monthly internet bill.

‘Privacy Means People Know What They’re Signing Up For’

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Interesting to watch in light of this week’s controversy over Facebook and Cambridge Analytica — Steve Jobs talking to Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher in 2010 regarding privacy:

Jobs: Are we going to be moving more into cloud-based things? Sure.

Mossberg: Doesn’t that inevitably…

Jobs: No! Privacy means people know what they’re signing up for. In plain English, and repeatedly. That’s what it means. I’m an optimist. I believe people are smart. And some people want to share more data than other people do. Ask them. Ask them every time. Make them tell you to stop asking them if they’re tired of you asking them. Let them know precisely what you’re going to do with their data. That’s what we think.

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sulrich
27 days ago
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jobs clearly overestimated folks.
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Trump Administration Scraps Obama-Era Proposal Requiring Airlines to Disclose Bag Fees

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Melanie Zanona, reporting for The Hill:

The Trump administration has scrapped an Obama-era proposal requiring airlines and ticket agencies to disclose baggage fees as soon as passengers start the process of buying a ticket.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) posted a notice on the Federal Register this week that it is withdrawing the proposed rule, along with another plan to force air carriers to disclose how much revenue they make from charging other ancillary fees.

What is wrong with these people? Who, other than airline beancounters, thinks scrapping this regulation is a good idea?

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sulrich
130 days ago
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uh, what about this administration has been about good ideas vs. satisfying the rapacious desires of special interests?
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Equifax Faces Hundreds of Class-Action Lawsuits and an SEC Subpoena Over the Way It Handled Its Data Breach

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Hayley Tsukayama, reporting for The Washington Post:

Equifax also said in its filings that it had received subpoenas from the Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia “regarding trading activities by certain of our employees in relation to the cybersecurity incident.” Shortly after news of the breach broke, reports circulated that top officials had sold Equifax stock after the company found out about the breach, but before disclosing it to the public. Equifax said this week that it had cleared its executives of wrongdoing after an internal investigation found that the executives did not personally know about the breach before their stock sales.

Yeah, I’m sure the SEC will just take their word for it.

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sulrich
160 days ago
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the SEC under this administration may very well "just take their word for it".
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Logitech Will Brick Its Harmony Link Hub for All Owners in March

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Chris Welch, reporting for The Verge:

Logitech has announced that it’s shutting down all services for the Harmony Link hub, a plastic puck the company released in 2011 that gave smartphones and tablets the ability to act as universal remotes for thousands of devices.

Owners of the product have received an email from the company warning that the Link will completely stop working in March. “On March 16th, 2018, Logitech will discontinue service and support for Harmony Link. Your Harmony Link will no longer function after this date,” the email says. There’s no explanation or reason given as to why service is ending in the email, but a Logitech employee provided more details on the company’s forums. “There is a technology certificate license that will expire next March. The certificate will not be renewed as we are focusing resources on our current app-based remote, the Harmony Hub.”

This sucks, but it seems like the way of the future with cloud-backed products. In the old days, products stopped working when they broke. Now, they stop working when the company that sold them loses interest in continuing to support them. It feels spiteful. More than ever, it matters how much you trust the company from which you buy stuff.

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sulrich
163 days ago
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if you're not thinking about the longevity and viability of the IOT vendor you're buying crap from then you're crazy.

it's the 80s all over again with
everyone wondering which ones will be around as long as the lifecycle of their widget.
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2 public comments
rtreborb
160 days ago
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Makes no sense. Renewing a certificate can be done in under an hour and costs under $1000
martinbaum
163 days ago
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This is going to force a lot of people to think long and hard about ecosystems with staying power when they purchase devices and will lead to more lock-in than ever. While that's certainly good for Apple and Google, it's not good for the rest of the tech world.
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